Public transport – Directorio Bus http://directoriobus.com/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 12:47:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://directoriobus.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-64-120x120.png Public transport – Directorio Bus http://directoriobus.com/ 32 32 On-demand public transport – cities of the future https://directoriobus.com/on-demand-public-transport-cities-of-the-future/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 04:44:31 +0000 https://directoriobus.com/on-demand-public-transport-cities-of-the-future/ On-demand public transport is transforming the way we travel. In fact, the on-demand app economy is changing and turning the world upside down! In 2021, we discussed the rise of apps on demandand post covid we continue to see more and more industries succeeding in this space including real estate, staffing and healthcare. In this […]]]>

On-demand public transport is transforming the way we travel. In fact, the on-demand app economy is changing and turning the world upside down!

In 2021, we discussed the rise of apps on demandand post covid we continue to see more and more industries succeeding in this space including real estate, staffing and healthcare.

In this article, however, we focus on on-demand public transport.

Transportation is fundamental to our society and the country’s economy. By creating an efficient and fully functioning transportation system, a city can improve access to employment, reduce traffic congestion, and facilitate broader business opportunities between consumers and suppliers.

COVID-19 has presented many challenges and opportunities over the past two years and travel is certainly one of them. Urban mobility trends have changed dramatically due to continued social distancing and working from home and studies suggest that people are not only choosing to travel outside of standard peak hours to avoid large crowds, but are actually changing completely their methods of transportation.

There is now a real shift in the way people choose to travel and get around in cities and during the first wave of COVID, Melbourne has seen a reduction of more than 70% in public transport use on all models.

This, coupled with regional internal migration and exodus from major capitals, has provided an opportunity for emerging technologies and emerging transportation in the form of carpooling, shared mobility, and autonomous vehicles.

Unsurprisingly, the king of ridesharing – Uber, has already expanded, offering Uber Transit and Uber Freight, providing on-demand options in public transport and logistics.

How on-demand public transport works

On-demand public transport allows passengers to book their journeys at a time that suits them via an application to be picked up at an agreed location. Also known as DRT (on-demand transport), it solves first and last mile connectivity issues that are a significant problem in urban mobility.

First and last mile connectivity issues relate to the distance a commuter must travel from a transit stop to their final destination or vice versa. This can particularly affect people with mobility needs and those who live in sparsely populated areas, where public transport options are few and far between.

On-demand public transport eliminates this problem by bringing travelers closer to their required destination at a time pre-scheduled by them.

Many countries have had success with on-demand public transport and now Australia is following suit, adopting new and innovative solutions.

Helsinki originally had success with an on-demand bus service, Kutsuplus ‘mobility on demand’ in 2013, This service brought together people traveling in the same direction on a minibus, this service was more efficient than traditional buses and cheaper than a taxi.

Unfortunately, the service was only available for three years and the company’s final reports concluded that yes, the pilot project had been a success, but “unfortunately the municipalities did not provide the funding for the proposed capacity increase in the difficult economic situation”.

There are now hundreds of on-demand public transport services around the world:

  • MOIA is an initiative between the City of Hamburg and Volkswagen and currently operates in Hamburg, offering the possibility of sharing a ride with up to five people who wish to travel in the same direction.
  • Ubigo operates in Stockholm and combines public transport, car sharing, car rental services and taxis in one app. For payment, the traveler can choose a mobility subscription.
  • Bus DiDi hopes to help improve the percentage of people who choose to take public transport in cities by making bus routes and shuttles available on request.

Closer to home in Australia, the success of pond services in New South Wales has demonstrated that on-demand public transport can bring economic benefits, including reduced emissions and socio-economic benefits within the community with the following statistics:

  • 55% of passengers previously made the same journey by private car. Half of these passengers were motorists driving and parking at or near the station.
  • 13% of individuals say in a recent survey that they would not have made the trip if they had not access to the OnDemand service

By 2050, Queensland’s population is expected to reach 8 million, placing significant constraint on our transport system. City leaders must therefore act now to prepare for the years to come to ensure their cities are able to continue to operate effectively.

On the Gold Coast, Translink on demand is currently being piloted and is now the city’s newest mode of public transportation. Operating seven days a week in Nerang, Highland Park and Pacific Pines, the two-year trial aims to improve public transport in areas of the northern Gold Coast where regular services are not as readily available.

In addition to this, the City of Gold Coast and RACQ are testing driverless bus for a 12-month period in Main Beach to improve connectivity to transit stops.

Public transport on demand

The benefits of on-demand public transport

On-demand public transport has many benefits within the community, besides reducing the number of cars on the road, cities can operate more efficiently, making them more attractive to tourists and more “liveable”.

Convenience

On-demand transit eliminates the fixed-route, fixed-schedule model and gives people more freedom to travel at times that suit them, which is a benefit for those who don’t have a driver’s license. or regular access to a car.

Accessibility

On-demand public transport provides a connection between small towns and large metropolitan areas, creating better access to jobs, education and opportunity, especially in less densely populated areas where public transport is not as easily accessible.

Sustainability

As mentioned earlier, the benefit of on-demand public transport is the reduction of carbon emissions and air pollution caused by single-passenger vehicles, buses and trains that have low capacity. On-demand public transport is a much more sustainable alternative.

Security

Safety is a huge plus when it comes to this type of transport. Not only does it accommodate the most vulnerable members of the community, including the elderly and people with disabilities, but eliminates the “stranger danger” felt by parents of young teenagers and women traveling alone late at night.

Transporting cities to the future

As more and more cities around the world are adopting the latest technologies and new solutions in response to urban mobility issues. On-demand transportation, whether public or private, will be the future of public transit.

According to research, the on-demand transport market will reach $340 billion by 2030. It is a market that also includes on-demand logistics, freight and fuel delivery.

While on-demand public transport options are currently managed by the government, we are seeing a trend towards partnerships with key players in these industries and other initiatives being outsourced to private operators.

As technology advances, the transport industry transforms, 6.64 billion people have access to smartphones and thus the gap between consumer and transport is narrowing considerably.

Transportation decisions made by municipal leaders today will affect economic prosperity, quality of life and tourism in the future.

Final Thoughts

The evolution of transportation dates back to the horse and cart, the invention of the wheel, and even the chasqui riders of the Inca Empire. As a company, we have continued to invent, evolve and adapt.

We are currently in an era where technology is having a huge impact on our daily lives, now including the way we travel and navigate our cities. If we as citizens and leaders accept change, think of where we will be in 100 years!

This article is reproduced from Media Shark, Gold Coast App Developers.


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The first electric flying ferry will make Stockholm’s river public transport faster than cars and the metro https://directoriobus.com/the-first-electric-flying-ferry-will-make-stockholms-river-public-transport-faster-than-cars-and-the-metro/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 18:00:09 +0000 https://directoriobus.com/the-first-electric-flying-ferry-will-make-stockholms-river-public-transport-faster-than-cars-and-the-metro/ Marine technology company Candela has released the first images of what will be the world’s fastest, longest and most energy-efficient electric vessel. The Candela P-12 shuttle, as this innovative vessel is called, will ferry citizens between Stockholm’s sprawling suburb of Ekerö and the city center over the coming year. Flying on water, the 30-passenger electric […]]]>

Marine technology company Candela has released the first images of what will be the world’s fastest, longest and most energy-efficient electric vessel. The Candela P-12 shuttle, as this innovative vessel is called, will ferry citizens between Stockholm’s sprawling suburb of Ekerö and the city center over the coming year. Flying on water, the 30-passenger electric vessel has a speed of 30 knots – considerably faster than any other electric vessel in the world. It also allows faster travel than the metro and bus lines it competes with, while being infinitely more energy efficient than diesel ships currently serving the same route. Perhaps most importantly, the ship is faster than traveling by car during rush hour.

The secret to its high speed and long range is the three carbon fiber wings that extend under the hull. These active hydrofoils allow the vessel to lift above the water, thereby decreasing drag.

500% more efficient ships
Candela’s technology reduces energy per passenger-kilometre by 95% compared to current vessels, enabling unprecedented range of 50 nautical miles at service speed. Using the equivalent of 0.1 kWh of electricity per passenger-kilometre, the ship is more energy efficient than a hybrid electric bus. Plus, with DC charging up to 200kW, it can charge its battery in less than an hour.

More importantly, the ultra-sharp carbon fiber sheets will cut commute times in half for many commuters.

With the ability to cover even Stockholm’s longest high-speed routes, the Candela P-12 shuttle will be used by the to shorten the journey between Stockholm’s growing suburb of Ekerö and the city centre. Currently a 55-minute journey by bus, metro or conventional ferry (or even by car during rush hour), the Candela P-12 shuttle will cover the 15 km journey in just 25 minutes, allowing the commuter to save an average of 50 minutes a day.

– This will have a huge positive impact on people’s lives – you can work an extra hour or pick up your children from school an hour earlier, says Erik Eklund.
As the Candela P-12 Shuttle hydrofoil creates a near-zero wake, it was granted an exemption from the 12 knot speed limit, allowing it to fly around downtown without causing damage to other vessels or shorelines. sensitive. In fact, the tiny propeller wash is considerably smaller than the wake of conventional passenger ships traveling at slow speeds.

Get rid of seasickness
The first electric flying ferry will also elevate the passenger experience to a whole new level, thanks to the most advanced computer system to be found in a passenger boat. Those prone to seasickness will appreciate the extremely smooth ride in inclement weather. Flying silently over the waves, the Candela Flight Controller – a computer that regulates hydrofoils 100 times per second – provides a smooth, smooth ride over the waves that would make many feel uncomfortable.

– There is no other ship that has this kind of active electronic stabilization. Flying on the P-12 shuttle in rough seas will feel more like being on a modern express train than on a ship: it’s quiet, smooth and stable, says Erik Eklund, Vice President, Commercial Ships at Candela.

The Stockholm region will operate the first P-12 shuttle ship for a nine-month trial period in 2023. If it lives up to the high expectations placed on it, the hope is that the city’s fleet of more of 70 diesel ships will eventually be replaced by P-12 Shuttles – but also that ground transportation from congested highways can move to waterways.

-Maritime traffic is the most popular public transport in the region, and I want to develop it. But we need better technology to travel faster and reduce climate impact. Therefore, we are happy to try this new technology for river traffic. This project can contribute to solutions that we can use in Stockholm, but also offers export and job opportunities in the Stockholm region, says Gustav Hemming, Vice President of the Stockholm Regional Executive Council.

The Candela P-12 Shuttle electric ferry will cut travel times from 55 to 25 minutes between the city of Stockholm and the suburb of Ekerö.

The Candela P-12 Shuttle electric ferry will cut travel times from 55 to 25 minutes between the city of Stockholm and the suburb of Ekerö.

The return of river transport
Since faster and cheaper steam trains began to replace expensive and slow coal-powered ocean liners in the 1850s, urban transport has come to rely on land vehicles – even in cities like Stockholm, San Francisco and New York, where the waterways provide natural cross-connections between regions and boroughs.

With Candela’s P-12 shuttle, the current status quo will once again be challenged. At peak times, the ship is faster than buses and cars on many routes. Thanks to the efficiency of the hydrofoil, it can also compete on mileage costs; and unlike new metro lines or highways, the flying electric super-ship can be inserted onto new routes without massive infrastructure investment – ​​all that is needed is a dock and electric power.

The practical size of the P-12 shuttle – with a comfortable and airy cabin for 30 seated passengers – adds to its versatility. In Stockholm, passenger ships have an average occupancy rate of 17%, which means that a 300-passenger ship only carries about 50 people most days.

Candela’s vision is to replace the current large, mostly diesel-powered vessels with nimble fleets of faster, smaller P-12 shuttles, allowing more frequent departures and more passengers carried, at lower cost to the operator. On the Stockholm-Ekerö route, Candela’s proposal is to replace the current pair of 200-person diesel vessels with at least five P-12 shuttles, which would double potential passenger volume and reduce operating costs.

– Instead of two departures per day, there would be a P-12 shuttle leaving every 11 minutes. This allows commuters to ignore timetables and simply go to the dock and wait for the next boat, says Erik Eklund.

Mass production for mass transit
Candela will lay the carbon fiber keel of the first-ever Candela P-12 shuttle at the company’s new automated factory in Rotebro, outside Stockholm, towards the end of 2022. After initial testing, the first commuters from Stockholm will embark on the 40-foot boat in 2023.

The first P-12 shuttle would be followed by many more as mass production ramped up at the company’s Rotebro plant. Using already streamlined production methods for Candela’s pleasure boat manufacturing, Candela aims to eventually spit out hundreds of P-12 shuttlecraft per year. Company sees huge demand from more than 600 cities, municipalities, ship operators and urban developers who have already expressed interest in the P-12 shuttle as a faster, cheaper and greener alternative to ships existing diesel or ground transportation.
Source: Candela

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No one should be allowed to stop public transport https://directoriobus.com/no-one-should-be-allowed-to-stop-public-transport/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 14:07:10 +0000 https://directoriobus.com/no-one-should-be-allowed-to-stop-public-transport/ SIMON JUPP IS THE CONSERVATIVE MP FOR EAST DEVON Many of us in East Devon use the rail regularly to get to school, work or see friends and family. The railways also connect many of our rural communities to Exeter, including Lympstone, Whimple and Cranbrook. It is a vital service for many, every day. As […]]]>

SIMON JUPP IS THE CONSERVATIVE MP FOR EAST DEVON

Many of us in East Devon use the rail regularly to get to school, work or see friends and family. The railways also connect many of our rural communities to Exeter, including Lympstone, Whimple and Cranbrook. It is a vital service for many, every day.

As readers know, members of the RMT union are on strike this week in a dispute with Network Rail over their pay, staff cuts and working conditions. I am concerned that this large-scale industrial action could continue over the summer, disrupting vital services, NHS appointments and GCSE exams.

There will be disruption to the resumption of our hospitality and tourism operations in Exmouth, Topsham and elsewhere, with people unable to reach hotels or honor restaurant reservations. In addition, the strikes could exasperate existing national work-from-home trends, hurting productivity and high street businesses. It will also add unnecessary extra stress to pupils who have to take important exams this week, with schools already writing to parents worried that their children are missing tests because they can’t get to school.

The government cannot support union demands for 11% wage increases. As we know, government money doesn’t exist – it’s your money. Despite £16billion in emergency grants during the pandemic, the tech reforms needed to make the extra funding sustainable are being blocked by militant unions.

One of these reforms is making a lot of noise: the closing of counters. In addition to reducing staff costs, this will allow station staff to be better placed on the platforms, to guide travelers and to meet all accessibility requirements. Since many people buy their train tickets online and access them on their smart phones, it is true that the government is looking for ways to modernize the railway. Not everyone is on the internet or has access to a smartphone and these people still need to be able to buy or collect their tickets at the station. While the systems need to be modernised, the railways need to remain accessible to all and I will push the government in this direction.

The strike takes place on Tuesday 21 st thursday 24 e and Saturday 26 e June, with only skeletal service on those days. The action has been designed for maximum disruption and the whole week will be severely impacted. We are particularly affected in the South West and I speak frequently with the railway companies, including GWR and SWR, about how they plan to alleviate the disruption for us here in East Devon.

On strike days GWR says they operate some services on the Devon main line to Paddington but these start late and end early. GWR expects these to be busy. GWR does not operate services along the Avocet line between Exmouth and Exeter. SWR does not offer services west of Basingstoke, also known as the West of England line. This means that there are no trains between Exeter and Whimple, Cranbrook and Honiton.

In-between days programming looks better with services on the network similar to typical Sundays. There is a risk of a slow start, however, with trains and drivers starting the day in the wrong place to begin normal service.

We are living in a staggering level of disruption – sparked by the unreasonable demands of left-wing, Labor-backed unions. It can’t happen again. I sit on the Transport Select Committee and will advocate for legislation requiring minimum service levels on the rail network.

While passenger numbers on the railways are doing well locally, they are still far from pre-pandemic levels nationally. These strikes will have permanently alienated some people from the railways. If we want to get more people to use public transport, we can’t let unions dictate when people can get to where they need to be. No one should be allowed to stop public transport.

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Lack of public transport makes Ireland a disconnected island – The Irish Times https://directoriobus.com/lack-of-public-transport-makes-ireland-a-disconnected-island-the-irish-times/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://directoriobus.com/lack-of-public-transport-makes-ireland-a-disconnected-island-the-irish-times/ The central theme of a shared island has remained present throughout the current government programme. But with entire counties systematically cut off from all railway infrastructure and a woefully insufficient supply of cross-border transport, we remain a totally disconnected island. For many residents of Fermanagh, Tyrone, Donegal, Cavan and Monaghan, there can be no starker […]]]>

The central theme of a shared island has remained present throughout the current government programme. But with entire counties systematically cut off from all railway infrastructure and a woefully insufficient supply of cross-border transport, we remain a totally disconnected island.

For many residents of Fermanagh, Tyrone, Donegal, Cavan and Monaghan, there can be no starker reminder of what once was than seeing a map of the rail network in the 1920s. In the 50 years since the partition, entire counties broke away from any established or intact rail infrastructure, which was further compounded by decades of underinvestment in road infrastructure and bus provision.

Transit poverty is a deep-rooted parasitic problem that has long ravaged our rural towns and villages. How can it be considered acceptable that entire communities be served by one bus per week? Meanwhile, investment and concentration continue to be priorities for the central hubs of Belfast and Dublin, with the prospect of an hourly train route between the respective cities to be established as early as next year. There is no shortage of trains and buses already connecting the two capitals, while the majority of the island and its disconnected population continue to languish desperately.

As an island and as a society, we are grappling under the weight of worsening crises: the housing crisis, the climate emergency, fuel shortages, and more. The solutions for each remain complex, but improving public transport infrastructure and provision continues to be massively overlooked as an effective way to make a substantial dent in the majority of these problems.

The role of transport in achieving ambitious climate goals has been recognized by the government in both the Climate Action Plan and the National Development Plan. Outside major cities, the lack of public transport leaves families no choice but to rely on cars, which increases emissions and pushes families even further below the poverty line due to the costs of transport. vehicle maintenance and rising fuel prices.

Increased rail infrastructure, green buses, cycling and pedestrian infrastructure all contribute to the government’s plan to cut carbon emissions by 51% by 2030, but what we’ve had so far, these are words, not deeds.

Currently, two out of five villages in the Republic lack public transportation options connecting residents to the opportunities and benefits available to those in nearby larger cities. In the North, rural villages in counties such as Tyrone and Fermanagh are so underserved that the vast majority of residents struggle to access basic health services. A recent report commissioned by Fermanagh and Omagh District Council found that up to 69 per cent of people in the area took more than two hours to get to the nearest hospital by public transport on any given weekday. , this percentage rising to 82% of the population. hospitalized residents forced to endure more than two hours on public transport over the weekend.

There has long been a stubbornness and reluctance to invest in rural areas – cost and population size being among the most prohibitive factors cited. But connecting our island would boost tourism, increase economic corridors, reduce our emissions, and reduce congestion and housing pressures, in addition to revitalizing our rural communities.

To prevent more people from falling below the poverty line, the government needs to be more proactive in mitigating the impact of inflation and fuel costs. A plan to reduce public transport expenses for young people has already come into effect, but why not go further and abolish public transport costs altogether? At least 98 cities and towns around the world provide citizens with some form of free public transportation. This, together with increased services, would reduce reliance on cars and with it costs.

Railways, dual carriageways, greenways and increased buses are all needed to achieve our most important goal, as is a reassessment of the routes currently in place. The government has set ambitious targets, with €35 billion earmarked for transport projects to be delivered by 2030. Whether that will translate into anything other than lofty aspirations over the lifetime of this government remains to be seen.

There has been a change in the government’s approach. Last year saw the launch of a public consultation on an all-island rail review, while the National Transport Authority launched a public consultation on rural Ireland’s tandem connection. However, both progress at a glacial pace. There are pockets of progress: Sligo, Cavan and Leitrim are working with Fermanagh and Omagh District Council to develop the Collooney-Enniskillen Greenway; and, after a decade of stagnation, the tender for the Narrow Water Bridge is on the horizon; but in the meantime, more can and should be done.

As a cross-border worker who regularly commutes between rural Fermanagh and Dublin via public transport – a venture that can take up to four hours each way – I can confidently say that we don’t need no more reports or reviews: we need urgent action to get help to those who need it most and unlock the potential of our island.

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Public transport | Philstar.com https://directoriobus.com/public-transport-philstar-com/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://directoriobus.com/public-transport-philstar-com/ Our poor commuters have been abandoned by the government. There, they wait for rides that don’t come because drivers and operators can’t afford the price of diesel. The stupidity of it all is a report quoting anonymous government officials imploring drivers to get out, drive their routes and perform public service. Drivers live day to […]]]>

Our poor commuters have been abandoned by the government. There, they wait for rides that don’t come because drivers and operators can’t afford the price of diesel.

The stupidity of it all is a report quoting anonymous government officials imploring drivers to get out, drive their routes and perform public service. Drivers live day to day in good times and are now out of pocket or abonado with current diesel pump prices.

They better plant camote in their home provinces. Or do any other type of work that will bring home something to put food on the table. Drivers and commuters are screwed by the government’s inability to do anything, anything.

That’s the problem with our makeshift public transportation system. It depends on thousands of small operators and drivers working to earn enough to pay a ‘limit’, pay for diesel and hopefully enough to feed a family.

This makeshift arrangement dates back to the ‘liberation’ era of World War II. It provided a livelihood for unemployed Pinoys for decades. The jeepney started out as converted military surplus jeeps. It used to be called auto calesa. Painted in folk art, it has become a Pinoy icon that we proudly display at tourism fairs abroad.

The jeepney is a symbol of popular entrepreneurship like the sari sari store. A returning OFW proudly advertises his jeep as ‘Katas ng Saudi’. There is a problem: this is not what public transport should be for a metropolis of more than 12 million inhabitants.

The other issue is the fuel it uses. Diesel is imported or processed in a refinery from imported crude oil. It keeps us hostage to the oil producers. We should have done something when the first oil shock happened to protect us from a crisis like this.

Some government officials have justified doing nothing by saying that the alternative, a government-run transit system, will have to be subsidized. With the jeepneys, bahala sila sa buhay nila. Besides, can you imagine how many more unemployed Pinoys there will be if the jeepneys are replaced?

So now we have this problem. The price of diesel is approaching P100/litre. Jeepney, tricycle and bus drivers cannot afford the cost of fuel to move people. Abandoning their roads makes sense. I can’t extract blood from turnips.

A few months ago, during the pandemic, when the public transport sector took a nap, Endika Aboitiz and Freddie Tinga tried an experiment in Davao City using all-electric minibuses. They called their project COMET or Community Optimized Managed Electric Transport.

They have 52 COMETs in the Philippines: Davao – 7; Cebu-9; CALABARZON – 4 and Manila – 32. They are looking at 250 units by the end of the year and a major deployment in the thousands by next year.

“Just to pay due respect, it was Endika who introduced us to the Formula E engineers in Spain and their manufacturing partners in China. These groups were instrumental in the design, engineering and production of our COMET minibuses,” said Freddie.

Endika and Freddie believe that the future of mass transport does not lie in fixed, heavy, expensive and long-term infrastructure projects. It’s also not about adding vehicles and carrying capacity.

Freddie explains, “It’s about leveraging new technologies to create lightweight, flexible and disruptive solutions that solve today’s traffic and transportation problems at a fraction of the price of the current transportation infrastructure that is being considered…

“Given the current demand for our COMET, I think the speed of our deployment will mainly depend on the amount of funding we can bring to the project. The goal for next year is to deploy at least 200 to 300 units per months, which, given the size of the market and the seriousness of the transport problem, remains a drop in the ocean.

I asked Freddie how the cost of running COMET compares to that of diesel-powered jeepneys.

“Jeepneys have an average mileage of 5.5km per litre. With diesel costing PPP 92.00 per litre, cost per km = PPP 16.72.

“Upgraded” Euro4 Jeepneys with air conditioning have a mileage of 3.2 km per liter. Diesel costing PPP 92.00 per litre, this means cost per km = PPP 28.75.

“The COMET motor consumes 290 watts per kilometer. Air conditioning and COMET electronics consume 2.3 kW per hour. Assuming that the COMET travels 200 km in 14 hours per day, the total power consumption of the COMET will be approximately 450 watts per km. With electricity costs at P10.00 per kWh, this means COMET cost per km = P4.50.

“So in other words, we’re running at about 1/6 the fuel cost of Euro 4 diesel.”

Freddie further explains, “So what we did was price the COMET at cost, partner with the jeepney operator by subsidizing part of the vehicle, and then find funding for the rest.

“The jeepney operator puts in a very small down payment (in our case P200,000) and then we find a way to fund everything else. In return we get a substantial reduction in transport revenue, plus the lion’s share advertising/media revenue We only win if the jeepney operator wins.

Freddie explained that in Davao, they had to overcome the negative bias that people associated with electric transportation. The majority of vehicles out there were nothing more than glorified upgraded golf carts with long charge times and batteries that died after a year of use.

The Davao project has been going on for over a year and a half. They get business customers in addition to advertising sponsorships.

“The important thing with Davao was to show that electric vehicles could run the same number of hours, if not more, than their diesel counterparts.

“COMET can, and should, and will replace jeepneys, UV expresses and other similar forms of transportation on the streets today.”

More on COMET’s business models in an upcoming column. We need this kind of innovative thinking to solve this growing public transportation problem. Our mobility must be adapted to the new technological era.

Boo Chanco’s email address is [email protected]. Follow him on Twitter @boochanco

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Italy faces public transport strike on Friday June 17 https://directoriobus.com/italy-faces-public-transport-strike-on-friday-june-17/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 13:59:06 +0000 https://directoriobus.com/italy-faces-public-transport-strike-on-friday-june-17/ National strike to affect the entire transport sector in Italy. Italy’s public transport network will be disrupted by a nationwide general strike on Friday June 17, with train services affected from 9:00 p.m. on Thursday June 16. The strike will disrupt various transport sectors at different times and has been called by a number of […]]]>

National strike to affect the entire transport sector in Italy.

Italy’s public transport network will be disrupted by a nationwide general strike on Friday June 17, with train services affected from 9:00 p.m. on Thursday June 16.

The strike will disrupt various transport sectors at different times and has been called by a number of unions representing public transport workers.

Trenitalia Services will be affected by the strike over a 24-hour period, starting at 9 p.m. on Thursday, but Frecce and Intercity high-speed trains will operate, as well as regional peak-hour services (6 a.m.-9 a.m. and 6 p.m.-9 p.m.).

Bus, metro, tram and light rail services in cities including the Italian capital are under threat on Friday: ATAC strike in Rome from 8.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m., EAV strike in Naples from 9 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and ATM strike in Milan from 8:45 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and from 6:00 p.m. until the end of service.

There is also a risk of disruption to air and sea travel, with people traveling to Italy on Friday being asked to confirm their times in advance.

Unions called strikes over a range of issues, including privatization, workplace safety and the “policies of the Draghi government and the European Union”.

Photo: Resul Muslu/Shutterstock.com.

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These EU cities have embraced free public transport https://directoriobus.com/these-eu-cities-have-embraced-free-public-transport/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 14:08:51 +0000 https://directoriobus.com/these-eu-cities-have-embraced-free-public-transport/ These EU cities have embraced free public transport The growing trend in the provision of basic services has its own name – zero tariff transport mobility as a basic human right and a free service: who would have thought this could be possible a few decades ago? However, in the EU, more and more places […]]]>

These EU cities have embraced free public transport

The growing trend in the provision of basic services has its own name – zero tariff

transport mobility as a basic human right and a free service: who would have thought this could be possible a few decades ago? However, in the EU, more and more places are starting to embrace the idea and offer their residents (and tourists) the possibility to move around their city without financial worries.

Nowadays, a comfortable life as a modern urban dweller is considered a necessity in prosperous societies. But it’s not just that. Concerns such as CO2 emissions from private transport, overcrowding, traffic jams and the need for more spaces were seen as problems requiring solutions. And then there was the war in Ukraine and the consequent rise in fuel prices which showed the precariousness of having to rely on owning a private car.

The Luxemburg The government was the first to respond, making the country in 2020 the first in the world to offer free public transport and beyond. It will soon be followed by Maltawhich will take the same step on October 1, 2022. However, these are very small countries with a small population.

Making public transport free at all levels in large societies might still be too complex and inefficient. More recently, the case of The test of the 9 euro banknote in Germany has shown that it can lead to overcrowding and problems during critical times like holidays.

More convenient and easier to manage is the introduction of free public transport in towns, districts and cities. If this proves successful over time, then it could be extended to a wider area. The approach is also known as zero-fare or free transport. In Europe, it was actually first tried in a suburb of Toulouse called Colomiers in 1971 and the service survived there until 2016 when it closed due to reorganization and inefficiency.

Things are only getting better, as a growing number of European local authorities are showing their dedication to providing public goods that benefit the people. And they’re not afraid to experiment in uncharted territory, like zero-fare transportation.

European cities with free transport

Following a referendum in 2013, the residents of Tallinn (capital of Estonia) voted overwhelmingly in favor of free public transport. The problem of Tallinn can be compared to the problem of the city of Luxembourg: thousands of commuters go to the city center every day. Additionally, many low-income people struggled to pay. The system has worked without any major problems for almost a decade now, although analysts say it has not led to a reduction in the number of passenger cars on the streets.

In the French town of Dunkirk, measures to provide free buses and trains have, however, led to a drop in traffic. Since 2018, residents can travel for free on public transport.

A study conducted a few months after the change found that it discouraged residents from driving their cars. Although two-thirds of respondents said they were dependent on cars, more than half said they now regularly take buses to get around. Around 5% even said that the availability of free buses convinced them to sell their car or not to buy a second vehicle.

In prison (also in France) was a pioneer in the implementation the first free tram network in the world, and public transport has been free since 2009. Initially seen as a simple test, the initiative has proven to be a resounding success. After three years, there were 5,000 fewer cars circulating in the city each day, a decrease of 10%. The popularity of public transport has also increased by 235%.

Cascais is, to date, the only municipality in Portugal to have opted for free public transport. And he is happy with the results.

Anyone who has heard of Livigno is probably also an avid skier. This village in the Italian Alps offers free public transport from 7:30 am until 8:00 pm. The city is very clear for its visitors: no one needs a car to discover it and it seems like a good way to stand out among winter destinations.

Rather than skiing in Italy, you might want to explore the island vibes of the North. Here is Ærø, a charming little Danish island, where you can take the bus for free as much as you want. It is known as the sunniest place in all of Denmark and its colorful houses and modest inhabitants make it an easy destination to choose. Keep in mind that the ferry that takes you to the island is not free, however.

Many people would rejoice if amsterdam were to set up a completely free public transport network. And while that’s still not a reality, the good news is that the city’s ferries floating through its canals are indeed free for pedestrians, cyclists and mopeds.

Not just a western phenomenon

If we turn our gaze to Eastern Europe, we will find that there are also notable examples of free transport.

Since 2011, people can use public transport for free in Frýdek-Mistek, a city in the east of the Czech Republic. The number of passengers increased by 40% in the first two years. What’s really cool is that the free buses easily take you to the more remote villages and thus go beyond the city borders to serve the bordering regions. The longest free ride takes you 30 kilometers further into the Beskydy tourist mountain.

The regional expansion aspect of zero-tariff services has also been introduced in parts of the Lower Silesian region Poland. Free transport exists in Polkowice, an industrial town of 22,000 inhabitants, and in certain settlements in its canton, in Lubin and in its entire canton and in certain settlements in the canton of Legnica, an industrial town of 100,000 inhabitants.

samokov is a town in Bulgaria of about 27,000 inhabitants, located at the foot of the Rila Mountains on the way to the famous ski resort of Borovets. The initiative was initially intended for locals only, but two years after its launch, public transport was offered free to all.

Velenje is the sixth largest city in Slovenia and one of the recently selected 100 climate-neutral and smart cities by 2030. It has a network of free yellow buses that transport you around the city. What makes this town so special, besides its enduring character, is Lake Velenje, the deepest lake in the whole country. Next to the city you will find a green oasis, which can be reached for free by bus.

These are some notable examples of European cities, which would also be worth visiting this summer in order to try their free public transport offer first hand. It remains to be seen whether they will serve as an inspiration for scaling up zero-fare transport on a larger scale.

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Passenger journeys on public transport were below pre-pandemic levels in late April https://directoriobus.com/passenger-journeys-on-public-transport-were-below-pre-pandemic-levels-in-late-april/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 10:20:04 +0000 https://directoriobus.com/passenger-journeys-on-public-transport-were-below-pre-pandemic-levels-in-late-april/ According to data from the Central Statistics Office (CSO), the number of passenger journeys on public transport at the end of April was below levels before the COVID-19 pandemic, public transport journeys in the week that started on April 24, 2022 being 77% of the number at the beginning of March 2020, before the start […]]]>

According to data from the Central Statistics Office (CSO), the number of passenger journeys on public transport at the end of April was below levels before the COVID-19 pandemic, public transport journeys in the week that started on April 24, 2022 being 77% of the number at the beginning of March 2020, before the start of the pandemic.

Train and bus journeys

In a statement on its website, the CSO said the number of bus journeys in Dublin for the week which started April 24, 2022 was 79% of the level at the start of March 2020, and that compares to 90 % for bus journeys outside Dublin and 63% for train journeys.

The CSO noted that the rail data includes passenger journeys on Intercity and DART services.

Lua Travels

Meanwhile, Luas trips increased by 86% between early January and late April this year, but Luas trips during the 17th week of this year were below pre-pandemic levels, with the number of trips during the 17th week of this year. year being at 80% of the level of the same week in 2019 for the Luas red line and at 81% for the Luas green line, according to the press release published on the CSO website.

Airport passenger data

The statement posted on the CSO’s website also says COVID-19 restrictions have led to a sharp drop in the number of passengers handled by Irish airports.

Passenger numbers at Dublin Airport in April this year were more than 19 times higher than in April last year, but 85% of the level seen in the same month in 2019, with 2,369,286 passengers in April 2022 and 2,789,660 in pre-pandemic April 2019, according to the statement posted on the CSO website.

Additionally, the statement posted on the CSO’s website noted that West Ireland’s Knock Airport was closed from April to June 2020 and February to May 2021, and Cork Airport was closed. closed in October 2021, and that Kerry’s data for April of this year was not available at the time of the statement’s release.

© 2022 Hospitality Ireland – your source for the latest industry news. Article by Dave Simpson. Click subscribe to subscribe to the Hospitality Ireland printed edition.

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Green public transport seen as key to tackling climate change https://directoriobus.com/green-public-transport-seen-as-key-to-tackling-climate-change/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://directoriobus.com/green-public-transport-seen-as-key-to-tackling-climate-change/ Green public transport seen as key to tackling climate change Several Alstom projects aim to solve pressing problems affecting the environment Cars at rest for the MRT’s Pink Line electric rail project. The 34.5 kilometer rail link between Nonthaburi and Min Buri is designed to meet the demand of commuters in northern Bangkok. Soaring petrol […]]]>

Green public transport seen as key to tackling climate change

Several Alstom projects aim to solve pressing problems affecting the environment

Cars at rest for the MRT’s Pink Line electric rail project. The 34.5 kilometer rail link between Nonthaburi and Min Buri is designed to meet the demand of commuters in northern Bangkok.

Soaring petrol prices coupled with high carbon emissions from vehicles mean that efforts to foster a reliable and environmentally friendly mode of public transport are key to helping Bangkok achieve its green ambitions, says Katrin Luger, Managing Director of Alstom Thailand.

The Thai government has drawn up a series of initiatives, such as the Climate Change Law, the National Energy Plan and the Long-Term Low Greenhouse Gas Emissions Development Strategy, to address the issues.

The country’s 20-year transport system development strategy also includes the development of inter-city rail links and a focus on green transport.

WHAT IS GREEN MOBILITY?

The term green mobility is often broad, but Ms Luger said it is a critical macro-level element in urbanization megatrends.

“As the population grows, and particularly in cities, there is an increasing need to move people safely and sustainably from point A to point B, which increases the demand not only for the rail but for all modes of transport,” she said.

According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), transport contributes around 27% of all global emissions. The five main types, ranging from most polluted to least, are large cars, aviation, cars, buses, two or three wheelers and rail.

Transportation is the only sector that has increased its carbon emissions over the past 20 years.

“If you look at the carbon footprint, particularly in relation to road travel, in fact only around 3.5% of CO2 emissions from the transport sector come from rail. I am convinced that if we strive to achieve a more carbon-neutral world, rail transport has a key role to play in both passenger and freight transport,” said Ms. Luger.

CONGESTION AND POLLUTION

Congestion and pollution are two big challenges for Bangkok. Officials, including Bangkok’s new governor and Thailand’s prime minister, have outlined how sustainability could play a key role in post-pandemic economic recovery.

As for the private sector, Alstom, which has been operating in Thailand for four decades, currently has several projects aimed at solving pressing problems affecting the environment, as well as training programs that promote the Thai talent pool.

Highlighting smart technology, the BTS Yellow Line provided by Alstom in Thailand is the country’s first automated monorail. Alstom Innovia APM 300 autonomous monorails can reach a maximum speed of 80 km/h. The line officially began testing towards the end of October last year. It is expected to carry around 42,000 passengers per day.

In addition, Alstom is also supplying 42 Innovia four-car monorail trains and 30 four-car driverless monorail trains for Bangkok’s Pink and Yellow Lines. The 34.5 km long rail link between Nonthaburi and Min Buri – also known as the Pink Line – is designed to meet the demands of commuters in northern Bangkok. The 30.4 km Yellow Line monorail system, with 23 stations in total, will run between Lat Phrao in Bangkok and Samrong in Samut Prakan.

“The pink and yellow lines are monorails, which is a fantastic innovation that we are bringing to Bangkok. And at full capacity, this system will be able to carry around 400,000 passengers per day. Imagine that one in 10 passengers took a car Au Instead, that’s 40,000 more or fewer cars on the road every day,” Ms Luger said.

Other projects include supplying 113 diesel locomotives to the National Railway of Thailand, laying track works for the extension of the Blue Line and Green Line, and maintaining signaling for the Purple Line. of Bangkok under Alstom’s 10-year contract.

STRENGTHENING RAILWAYS

In education, Alstom recently partnered with the Faculty of Engineering at Chulalongkorn University. The two parties signed a memorandum of understanding this month to foster greater collaboration in local industry research and development, as well as education and training programs in this highly specialized field of railway engineering over the next five years.

Supot Teachavorasinskun, Dean of Chula Engineering, said the growing demand for professional human resources in transport development in Thailand has sparked students’ interest in railway engineering.

“Chula Engineering’s expertise, such as mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, civil engineering, and others, can help build the foundations and theories. And when students can engage in practice with market leaders like Alstom and learn the real applications in the industry, they will be able to improve their skills and refine their knowledge,” he said.

Meanwhile, Alstom is also using Bangkok as a global engineering delivery center in Asia-Pacific for railway signaling and systems integration. There are over 400 engineers in the company, 85% of whom are Thai, with the rest coming from 25 different countries.

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‘Anti-public transport’ Pakatan government blamed for current traffic congestion, says Dr Wee https://directoriobus.com/anti-public-transport-pakatan-government-blamed-for-current-traffic-congestion-says-dr-wee/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://directoriobus.com/anti-public-transport-pakatan-government-blamed-for-current-traffic-congestion-says-dr-wee/ PETALING JAYA: The current traffic congestion in the country, especially in the Klang Valley, is due to the fact that Pakatan Harapan has postponed and delayed several public transport infrastructure projects, says Datuk Seri Dr. Wee Ka Siong. “When Pakatan took over as government in 2018, it scrapped or postponed several public mega-projects, including the […]]]>

PETALING JAYA: The current traffic congestion in the country, especially in the Klang Valley, is due to the fact that Pakatan Harapan has postponed and delayed several public transport infrastructure projects, says Datuk Seri Dr. Wee Ka Siong.

“When Pakatan took over as government in 2018, it scrapped or postponed several public mega-projects, including the HSR, Johor Woodlands RTS Link and the dual-track electrified rail project.

“They also scaled back the LRT3 plans by canceling five of its stations and tunnel works as well as using trains with fewer cars which ultimately delayed the completion of the project until 2024,” said the Minister of Transport in a Facebook post on Saturday (June 4).

He was responding to Johor DAP President Liew Chin Tong, who said there was a need to develop public transport to ease traffic congestion.

“The operation of the MRT 2 project has also been delayed until June 16 after Pakatan abandoned the project.

“As an ‘anti-public transport’ government, Pakatan has canceled many public transport projects that could solve traffic jams, but now that it has become the opposition, isn’t it hypocritical for Liew to ask how solve traffic jams, to say the least?

“I did not say that the Ministry of Transport was unable to solve the traffic jams, but I had pointed out that the ministry was trying to solve the traffic jams.

Dr Wee said the Department of Road Transport (JPJ) had also issued a statement recently to highlight the restriction of vehicles carrying goods from entering Kuala Lumpur city center during peak hours, when many them ignore this ban and cause traffic jams in Selangor and KL. during peak hours.

“I have therefore asked JPJ to increase its staff to enforce this rule in the hope of reducing traffic congestion, in particular by requesting more traffic police to direct traffic in areas with high congestion.

“In the long term, we need to improve the quality of our public transport and reduce traffic congestion due to the high number of cars on the road.

Dr Wee said Public Works Minister Datuk Seri Fadillah Yusof also announced that the government had approved three new highway projects with the Federal Lands Ministry and DBKL exploring different approaches to reduce traffic congestion.

“Liew Chin Tong’s suggestion is very simple, that the government should support and subsidize public transport, which we have done with an allocation of RM115 million for My50 and My100 unlimited passes.

“I wonder to what extent the government, which Liew Chin Tong says is on the verge of bankruptcy, should increase its subsidies,” Dr Wee asked.

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